jobs

Robots vs. Middle-class jobs

A recent blog post by James Pethokoukis at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI), "Is automation really the worst enemy of the US middle class?," adds perspective to the ongoing debate over how much impact robots and automation have on jobs:

Special Report: Using Tax Policy to Promote Economic Vitality

Our latest Special Report, "Using Tax Policy to Promote Economic Vitality," offers a comprehensive look at Washington's system of business taxes and tax preferences. You can read the report here.

Policy Today podcast: Expanded state environmental regulations threaten union jobs

Today's topic is the expanded state environmental regulations that, due to their arbitrary and excessive nature, threaten to send good-paying jobs - many of them union jobs - out of Washington state.

InFocus: Possible charter schools ruling re-do, construction jobs, paid family leave study

This week we're discussing the Attorney General's request that the state Supreme Court reconsider its ruling that charter schools are unconstitutional, the number of construction jobs staying essentially flat statewide, and a federal grant for Washington to study the feasibility of paid family leave implementation.

In this episode:

Manufacturing Jobs: Lots of openings, not enough skilled workers

The Puget Sound Business Journal recently brought together a panel of Puget Sound manufacturers to discuss the problem, verging on crisis, of finding skilled workers.

In a nutshell: “Manufacturers can’t find workers to fill open positions.” And these are good-paying blue-collar positions.

Seattle Times columnist writes about that mythical $8.7 billion tax break for Boeing: not a giveaway!

Erik Smith used our recent policy brief as a peg for an excellent column on tax policy in today's Seattle Times.

Though the Department of Revenue calculated it exactly as it was supposed to, a more realistic view is that the legislation costs taxpayers nothing.

He summarizes, drawing on points we developed in the brief.

More details on Seattle's proposed $15 minimum wage

The Puget Sound Business Journal has a good overview. As the PSBJ reports, it's complicated.

Economists wrangle over $10.10 minimum wage, CFOs say increase will slow hiring

Among the challenges faced by policymakers (and that includes voters) trying to determine the effects of raising the minimum wage is sorting through the flood of conflicting information. Much of the conflict comes because people who are supposedly talking about the same thing are not, really, talking about the same thing.

Regional economist sets a low bar. Says a $15 minimum wage is "not outrageous." It's also not a good idea.

Regional economist Dick Conway told KPLU that a $15 minimum wage is "really not that outrageous." Conway has been on record before; he was the economist Gov. Inslee cited by name at AWB's legislative day (about 41 minutes in).

Warren Buffet says $15 minimum wage would hurt jobs, Speaker Chopp says no vote on $12 minimum this year, and more

Warren Buffett weighs in on the federal minimum wage.

"If you could have a minimum wage of $15 and it didn't hurt anything else, I would love it," he said. "But clearly that isn't the case."

However, he added, he wouldn't argue with President Obama's proposal for a more modest increase, to $10.10 an hour from $7.25 an hour currently.

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